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Introduction


The following report uses data taken from the business surveys carried out by the Chamber as a part of LSIP project. This daily survey asks businesses a series of questions on key indicators - Confidence, Investment, Knowledge, Skills, and Behaviour. The survey ran from 10th January'22 and 11th February'22.

Summary


In total, there were 121 businesses involved in the business survey. Of these, 42 can be broadly classified as Manufacturers, 52 can be broadly classified as Sports and health businesses and 28 fall under Logistics sector. 12.0% of businesses employed fewer than 10 people. 26.0% employed 10-49 people. 30.0% employed 50-249 people. 31.0% employed over 250 people. Looking at the districts, 26.0% businesses belong to Leicester, followed by 13.0% from Charnwood and 15.0% from Hinckley and Bosworth. 7.0% businesses belong to Blaby, 11.0% from Harborough, 10.0% from Melton, 12.0% from North West Leicestershire, and 6.0% businesses were from Oadby and Wigston.

The data is collected through surveys using API that allows the capability to merge all the business survey data. The collected data is then cleansed and modified which is later analysed through scripts that provides capability to develop visualisations. This way the whole process is automated and remains sustainable for long time until APIs are changed by external party.

Results


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  • represents Logistics sector.
  • represents Manufacturing sector.
  • represents Sport & Health sector.

Commentary


Emerging discussion points from Business Survey

Confidence

  • All sectors have relatively low levels of confidence when asked about their ability to recruit the people they needed to meet their businesses’ ambitions. Manufacturers gave an average score of 5.2 out of 10. Logistics businesses 5.3 and Sport & Health businesses 5.6.

Investment

  • When asked how much of the cost they should pay towards investing in training staff there was a wide variation among respondents, although a consistent average across all three sectors of approximately two thirds.
  • When asked how any remaining cost should be covered 43% felt Government should fund this compared to 31% who thought there should be a specific tax/levy and 20% who felt the individual should cover the cost.

Knowledge Areas

  • Across all sectors, technical and vocational knowledge areas are the most important to a business’s success. The next four top areas are: Basic literary; Basic numeracy; Health & Safety; Basic IT.
  • The areas least important to a business are: Marketing theory; Advanced IT; employment rights; Financial knowledge; Social media
  • With regards to the types of qualifications, the most relevant for logistics businesses are professional body qualifications, apprenticeships and GCSEs. For manufacturers these are degrees, apprenticeships and GCSEs and for Sport & Health businesses, professional body qualifications, degrees and GCSEs.
  • Word of mouth, online platforms and recruitment agencies are the most popular forms of accessing people with the right knowledge areas. The Sports & Health sector also makes more use of universities. The top reasons given are the volume and breadth of candidates, a deemed high capacity of the provider to meet their needs, cost and convenience
  • Schools, Careers Fairs, ITPs and job centres are the least popular forms of accessing people with the right knowledge areas. A perceived low level of training is the main reason for this.

Skill Areas

  • Team working is the most important skill across all sectors, followed by: verbal communication; specific occupational skills; written communication and time management
  • The areas least important are: industry software skills; coding and programming; sales; project planning and management and leadership
  • With regards to the types of qualifications, the most relevant for logistics businesses are professional body qualifications, apprenticeships and non-accredited courses. For manufacturers they are degrees, apprenticeships and BTECs and for Sport & Health businesses they are professional body qualifications, apprenticeships and degrees.
  • The most popular forms of accessing people with the right skills areas are word of mouth, online platforms and recruitment agencies. The top reasons given is volume and breadth of candidates, a deemed high capacity of the provider to meet their needs, cost and convenience
  • The least popular are schools, job centre, careers fairs, FE colleges and independent training providers. These are deemed to have low capacity, low levels of training and a poor volume and breadth of candidate.

Behaviour areas

  • Being a team player is the most important behaviour, followed by: being hard working; reliable; resilient; and honest
  • The areas least important are: being assertive; innovative; polite; eager to learn; and self-motivated
  • With regards to the types of qualifications, the most relevant for logistics businesses are apprenticeships, non-accredited courses, BTECs and professional body qualifications. For manufacturers they are apprenticeships, degrees, professional body qualifications. For Sport & Health businesses they are professional body qualifications, apprenticeships and degrees.
  • The most popular forms of accessing people with the right behaviours are word of mouth, online recruitment platforms, face-to-face recruitment agencies and universities. The main reasons given are good volume and breadth of candidates, high capacity to provide good candidates and convenience.
  • The least popular forms are careers fairs, job centre plus and schools. The main reasons given are low capacity to provide good candidates, low level of training and poor volume and breadth of candidates.

The relative importance of Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours

  • Having people with the right behaviours is deemed the most important for a business’s success. This is particularly so for logistics businesses.
  • Having people with the right skill areas was deemed slightly more important than knowledge.
  • In terms of the importance of recruiting behaviours, knowledge and skill areas (as opposed to training them once in post), the gap was larger between the three areas, with behaviour again deemed most important, followed by skills and knowledge, suggesting that businesses feel more able to train recruits with the appropriate knowledge and skill areas than behaviours.
  • In terms of ease of recruitment all areas scored lower than previous answers. Behaviours are deemed to be the easiest to successfully recruit for, followed by skills and knowledge areas, however, these latter two scores are both pulled down by Manufacturing businesses, who averaged significantly lower.
  • Overall, skills-based qualifications were deemed to be the most important when recruiting, followed by knowledge and then behaviours, with the latter deemed to be less aligned to any specific qualification.

Other observations
All sectors have relatively low levels of confidence when asked about their ability to recruit the people they need to meet their ambitions, with Manufacturers the least confident, followed by Logistics and Sport & Health businesses.

  • Approximately one-third believe publicly funded courses don’t meet their KSB needs very well if at all, while just under three in 10 believe they meet their needs quite well or very well.
  • When asked how much of the cost they should pay towards investing in training staff there is a wide variation among respondents, although a consistent average across all three sectors of approximately two-thirds.
  • When asked how any remaining cost should be covered four in 10 feel Government should fund this compared to three in 10 who thought there should be a specific tax/levy and one-fifth who felt the individual should cover the cost.
  • The majority of businesses plan future investment in recruitment over a 6-24 months timescale, although approximately a third plan over a 0-6 months timescale. Very few plan over 24 months in advance.
  • When investing in training, the majority plan when or just before the training is needed.
  • In terms of how future needs will be met, when asked to rank on a scale of 1-10 how important training, recruitment and automation will be, training scored 7.9 out of 10, recruitment 6.8 and automation 5.9, although this final figure was pulled down by Sport and Health businesses who scored it significantly lower.
  • With regards to having the right digital knowledge and skills in place over the next 6 months, 24 months and beyond 2 years, the logistics sector was the most confident, followed by manufacturers then sport & health, although no sector scored more than 6.8 out of 10 overall for any timeframe
  • With regards to having the right environmental knowledge and skills in place over the next 6 months, 24 months and beyond 2 years, the logistics sector was again the most confident, followed by manufacturers then sport & health, although no sector scored more than 7.7 out of 10 overall for any timeframe.